Most Underrated Geckos - 49 Pristurus carteri
Most Underrated Geckos - 49 Pristurus carteri

The first time I had ever heard of Pristurus carteri, better known as Carters scorpion tailed gecko, was back in 2008 when I was researching Japanese Goniurosaurus and happened upon Phil Trempers website. As I was scrolling down the page to find Goniurosaurus I came across this peculiar looking gecko that had a almost bird like face, long delicate legs and a strange curled tail covered in little fleshy spikes. I was hooked at first sight!   After doing some research on them I contacted Mr. Tremper for the first available pair. After a little bit of a wait I finally got two of these strange little geckos towards the end of 2008. This is where the obsession begins. Pristurus carteri get their common name scorpion tailed gecko from the defensive behavior of arching and curling the tail over their backs similar to how a scorpion would when threatened. The ability to curl the tail and waive it side to side is a good way for the species to communicate in the rocky outcrops of the [ ... ]

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Most Underrated Geckos - 48 Homopholis fasciata
Most Underrated Geckos - 48 Homopholis fasciata

I stumbled upon Homopholis fasciata about 1 ½ years ago while browsing random a href="/most-underrated-gecko-index" style="color: #0000cc; text-decoration: underline;">  Facebook reptile groups. Seeing just one photo, I was struck by how morphologically interesting they were. Their short, rounded heads, relatively long and thin tail, and banded gray/silver pattern was immediately ingrained in my mind. I knew from then on I had to have some. Luckily, within a month or two, I ended up with 2.2 long term captive specimens and have managed to breed them two seasons in a row.   H. fasciata as a whole is incredibly hardy, perhaps even more than everyone’s favorite Correlophus ciliatus. Aside from providing a puck light that gives them a basking temperature of 95 F, I mist nightly and give the adults food 2-3 times a week. Ambient temperatures have been as high as 84 (summer) and even as low as 55 F (winter). Hatchlings are kept at 80-82 F in fruit fly deli cups, and fed 3-4 times a week.    Read the entire article href="/homopholis-fasciata" target="_blank">HERE Hardy wi [ ... ]

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Most Underrated Geckos - 47 Lepidodactylus lugubri...

Lepidodactylus lugubris (more commonly known as the Mourning Gecko.)

These geckos are only a handful of geckos in the world that are Parthenogenic; meaning they require no males for reproduction. I feel they are very underrated for many reasons which I'll highlight upon.
A mourning gecko is a small gecko that only reaches a little over 4 inches from nose to tail. They're a light beige to brown color with some spots running down the length of their back to the tail. They will change from a lighter color to a darker color depending on temperature and mood. Although these geckos are nocturnal, they can often be seen basking under a light in the early hours of the morning before they head for the safety of the cages decor for the day.

Mourning geckos are a great species to keep because of the ease of feeding. They will readily eat pureed fruit, meal replacement powder and different kinds of insects. I feed mine a combination of CGD, dubia nymphs and pinhead crickets. It's always a wond [ ... ]

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Most Underrated Geckos - 46 Uroplatus

Uroplatus   First a little description on the genus of Uroplatus geckos.  There are currently 17 species, split into four semi scientific groups, three of these species are still awaiting a description these are labeled with aff. (Affinity) between the genus and the species name.  Lastly many were only discovered in the last 50 years.  All Uroplatus are endemic (native, only found on) to the island of Madagascar and its loyalty islands such as Nosy Be where several species can be found.  All members of the genus are threatened with extinction due to habitat loss from farming as well as charcoal ,and titanium mining.  The most endangered of the group (genus) is the Uroplatus guetheri or "Guenther's leaf-tail gecko".  This is due to its very limited and fragile primary forest on Madagascar's western side.  It is a sad fact that mainy of these fascinating geckos could be gone in the wild in our life time.
Uroplatus geckos are with out a dought [ ... ]

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Most Underrated Geckos - 45 Paroedura vazimba

Paroedura vazimba As with most Madagascan reptiles, geckos of the genus Paroedura are outstanding to keep!  While not the most commonly sought-after genus (apart from the touchier, more expensive species like gracilis or masobe), they are extremely rewarding to keep, and very affordable relative to many other rarer species of gecko.             Of this already awesome genus, Paroedura vazimba may be my favorite of those that I keep.  These little insect snipers are extremely easy husbandry-wise, and super enjoyable to observe during their active hours!  I provide somewhat vertically-oriented 8-10 gallon enclosures for adults, with a peat/mulch substrate, lots of cork bark, and some plants for aesthetics, and they do very well.  During the day, they use cork slab crevices or leaf litter for hiding spots.  When the lights go out, though, they go on the prowl with their inquisitive attitudes and prehensile [ ... ]

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Most Underrated Geckos - 44 Uroplatus phantasticus

Uroplatus phantasticus Uroplatus phantasticus.  By far one of the most naturally diverse and unique geckos we work with.  Phantasticus are the smallest bodied of the Uroplatus and prefer cooler temperature and an environment enriched lower level and foliage.  Unlike many other Uroplatus, phantasticus have evolved to mimic dead and dying leaves and will often hunt on and between foliage.  They also can be frequently seen sleeping suspended from their hind legs, which further mimic the appearance of a dying leaf.  Their small size and environmental/husbandry needs attribute to them being a more difficult species requiring a more experienced keeper. Although they are a species that prefers not to be handled and relatively left alone, that doesn’t mean they are not exciting to keep and work with.  They are very active hunters and will often hop around chasing insects or dive bomb a passing isopod.  With an adequately arranged enclosure, just finding [ ... ]

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Most Underrated Geckos - 43 Tarentola chazalia

Tarentola (Geckonia) chazalia    One of my favorite gecko species is actually one which I no longer work with, but still get numerous inquiries about… the helmeted gecko. I worked with a small group of these geckos for about 6  or 7 years, hatching out approximately 20 - 30 offspring in that time. I enjoyed the bold attitude and angry looking appearance of this species. A few individuals actually had an attitude to match their appearance, but most were quite calm and quickly came to realize that my appearance in the gecko room meant food was coming. I eventually made the difficult decision to phase these out of my collection to make room for new projects, but they remain one of the most engaging species I have worked with, and I hope to eventually work with them again some day.   Most printed references still refer to this gecko species as ckonia chazalia, but in the ever changing world of taxonomy, many are now referring to this species as Tarentola chaza [ ... ]

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Most Underrated Geckos - 42 Paroedura lohatsara

Paroedura lohatsara   As much as I love all of my other species, there’s something particularly enjoyable about wandering into my gecko room at night, pointing a penlight into a tank, and seeing my Paroedura lohatsara staring back at me. Small, nocturnal, and relatively hardy, these little geckos are definitely fun. Hailing from Madagascar, the adults of this species reach a length of approximately five to seven inches from the tip of their nose to the tip of their tail, or three to four inches snout to vent.  Weight falls between 11 and 14 grams when mature.  Males and females both reach about the same size, but can generally be sexed between three and six months of age with males developing a hemipenal bulge, whereas females do not.  Females may begin laying infertile eggs at approximately a year of age, without ever being paired with a male.   Hatchlings emerge from their hard shelled eggs at approximately 120 days, though this duration can vary [ ... ]

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Most Underrated Geckos - 41 Teratoscincus scincus ...

The Giant Wonder Gecko (Teratoscincus scincus keyserlingi) I first encountered these awesome geckos at SEWERFest in Sturtevant, WI. 
They were unique little terrestrial geckos with bright yellow and satin black striped from head to tail, and they were full of attitude.  I instantly loved how bold and animated they were.  Then I heard something that made these animals a must have for me.  A rattling noise was coming from the deli cup while this little gecko stood up tall on al fours and waived his tail.  It almost sounded like a rattlesnake!  This sound was made by the scale textures of the large scales on the top of the tail rubbing together as they waived it around.  I bought two, and at the next show bought another, and absolutely love their attitudes.  When they want food, they come to the front of their enclosure and sit like puppies just waiting for a treat, but if you bother them, they immediately puff up, stand tall, and rattle their  [ ... ]

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Most Underrated Geckos - 40 Geckolepis

I have an unfortunate tendency to develop an interest in species at the worst possible times,
usually when they’re not available at all.  Such was the case with the genus ckolepis.  I had seen them available before, but never paid much attention to them.  After seeing how cheap imports are (they’re almost entirely available as wild caught specimens), I decided they’d be worth a try and started researching them heavily.  I had heard that they were extremely flighty, would shed their scales in your hand if you ever picked them up, and were strictly nocturnal. While there is an element of truth to these claims, none of them are particularly applicable- in fact these geckos are so much fun to keep.      My geckos were sold to me as olepis maculata, but I refer to them simply as Geckolepis since researchers consider that species to be a complex in need of further study.  Due to their ability to shed and regrow their scales when  [ ... ]

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Most Underrated Geckos - 39 Sphaerodactylus

The genus Sphaerodactylus belongs to the sub-family Sphaerodactylinae (ball finger geckos).
With about 100 different species, this puts Sphaerodactylus in the lead for having the most species of geckos within a genus. Furthermore the genus contains as many subspecies as species. The main distribution of this genus comprises the large and small Antillen islands, as well as the Central American mainland. The largest biodiversity can be found on Hispaniola where about 35 species live, followed next by Cuba. Approximately 25 species can be located in Cuba. The northern most distribution boundary is in Florida with 3 species. A few species occur down to the Brazilian east coast, which is the southernmost distribution zone of the actual ball finger geckos. All representatives of the genus Sphaerodacylus are very small insectivorious lizards. The largest species such as Sphaerodactylus dimorphicus and Sphaerodactylus torrei reach a total length of 8 centimeters. The smallest, Sphaerodacty [ ... ]

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Most Underrated Geckos - 38 Sphaerodactylus fantas...

Sphaerodactylus fantasticus karukera
  Sphaerodactylus is the most speciose rich genus of geckos, with around 100 species described and as much subspecies. They are found from Florida, where it is not clear if they had been there naturally or introduced down to Brazil. They are very small anima with Spaherodactylus ariasae and parthonopion being the smallest lizards. The largest species can reach a length of 8cm. Sphaerodactylus fantasticus karukera was described in 1964 by R. Thomas. The species occurs in Guadeloupe on a small Island called îlet du Gosier and on the Islands îles de la Petite Terre. The species is a medium size Sphaerodactylus reaching around 6cm (just over 2 inches) Like most Sphaerodactylus, this is a diurnal species.  They are best kept in pair as both sex show rather high territorial behavior towards con specific of the same gender. A glass terrarium of 30/30/30 is a good fit for a pair. Bottom consist of a mixed of humus and sand (2/1). Rear an [ ... ]

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Most Underrated Geckos - 37 Paroedura picta

[Ocelot – Panther - Madagascar ground gecko] This small Madagascar Island gecko is clever, alert and quick; however, it is not in the least aggressive. They will escape by style="color: #0000cc; text-decoration: underline;" href="/most-underrated-gecko-index"> running, jumping and even leaping (if required) but are very handle-able after working with them and are quite content to rest on the heel of your hand, palm or fingers (until they decide they have had enough). There are two sizes of these “little beauties” in my collection: the normal (1-2 grams at birth and 3 to 3 1/2” adult length) (Shown) and the larger size (4 to 4 1/2+” adult length). The patterns related to the smaller size are typically either cross banded or striped; whereas, the larger size is usually striped or reticulated. I have not seen the large cross banded type as yet; however, their adult weight can top 20 grams!   o variations: Normal Striped (Baby on bottom) and Normal Cross banded (Baby on top)   Note the unique head markings, patterning, toe pads, curling tails a [ ... ]

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Most Underrated Geckos - 36 Cyrtodactylus peguensi...

Thai Bow-Fingered Gecko / Ocelot Spotted Gecko These geckos are one of my favorites.  Their simple care, small size, and quirky behavior
make them ideal pets for anyone looking for something new and fascinating.  Their coloration and pattern can be very striking.   They have very good appetites, and hunt down their insect prey (cricktes, roaches etc.) with gusto!  They can be handled on occasion, but very carefully.  Also these geckos cannot climb glass. You need to be aware of the branches or other structures that they can climb onto to get to the top.    Small to medium sized enclosures such as 10-20 gal aquariums/Exo-Terra's work well.  The setup should include damp substrate of either coco fiber or peat moss mixed with sphagnum moss to help maintain humidity. Cage decor suggestions, cork bark tubes and flats, branches, live plants, rocks, all types of hides.  A misting system or daily misting  with a spray bottle is sugge [ ... ]

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Most Underrated Geckos - 35 Blaesodactylus boivini

Blaesodactylus boivini is a hidden gem of Madagascar.  These large, active, arboreal geckos
range across the island of Madagascar, with the highest population densities occurring mainly in the northeast, with pockets of animals on off shore islands, and an isolated subpopulation located further south.  This species resides on tree trunks and amongst rock piles with a preference for dry, deciduous forest habitat.  They will also hang around human habitation to take advantage of pest species as prey, much like the tokay and house geckos of Asia.  These geckos are large and impressive, with an average adult size of 10-14 inches, and some individuals weighing in excess of 160 grams.  Females tend to be slightly larger and heavier than males, as well as sport large, obvious calcium sacs.  Sexing is extremely easy:  males have large obvious pores, even from hatching.  These geckos are partially fruigivorous, and will consume some soft fruit in addi [ ... ]

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