Pristurus carteri - Carters Scorpion Tailed Gecko
Pristurus carteri - Carters Scorpion Tailed Gecko

 The first time I had ever heard of Pristurus carteri, better known as Carters scorpion tailed gecko, was back in 2008 when I was researching Japanese Goniurosaurus and happened upon Phil Trempers website. As I was scrolling down the page to find Goniurosaurus I came across this peculiar looking gecko that had a almost bird like face, long delicate legs and a strange curled tail covered in little fleshy spikes. I was hooked at first sight!   
Pristurus carteri posing  After doing some research on them I contacted Mr. Tremper for the first available pair. After a little bit of a wait I finally got two of these strange little geckos twords the end of 2008. This is where the obsession begins. I was expecting this species to be just like most other more common terrestrial geckos with the exception of being diurnal. I assumed like most they would sleep and hide a fair amount only occasionally getting up to wander about the enclosure. Boy was I surprised wh [ ... ]

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Homopholis fasciata - A Gecko You Should Keep
Homopholis fasciata - A Gecko You Should Keep

I stumbled upon this species about 1 ½ years ago while browsing random Facebook reptile groups. Seeing just one photo, I was struck by how morphologically interesting they were. Their short, rounded heads, relatively long and thin tail, and banded gray/silver pattern was immediately ingrained in my mind. I knew from then on I had to have some. Luckily, within a month or two, I ended up with 2.2 long term captive specimens and have managed to breed them two seasons in a row.
Homopholis fasciata are located in East Africa, from Tanzania up to Ethiopia. Arboreal in nature, H. fasciata may be located in trees, often wedged deep within tight crevices. They are not a large gecko, reaching lengths of 2-4” SVL. Currently, my largest female is ~3 ½“ SVL, with 2- 2 ½“ SVL being closer in size to my other 2.1. The genus Homopholis is restricted to Africa, with a sister taxa, Blaesodactylus, which is endemic to Madagascar. H. fasciata can easily be differentiated from the other known spe [ ... ]

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Paroedura picta of the Spiny Forest

Paroedura picta of the Spiny Forest
As a research assistant for a month in the summer of 2012, I rediscovered my passion for herpetology and fell in love with Paroedura picta near the village of Ifotaka in the Spiny Forest of Madagascar. The Spiny Forest is aptly named. Unlike the rain forests of Madagascar’s northern and eastern regions, this area felt almost like a desert. With temperatures ranging from over 100º F during the day and around 50ºF at night in the dry season (their version of winter), all indigenous species had to adapt to the harsh conditions. Almost every plant species had some form of spines or thorns, from alluaudia (pictured above) to aloe to rapotaka (which means “stuck” in the native language Malagasy – a fitting name for the well-camouflaged plant with fish-hook-shaped thorns). A moment’s pause revealed an area filled with endemic creatures I had dreamed of and never imagined, from the hills and valleys to the dry riverbed to the sheer cliffs; [ ... ]

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Hemidactylus tanganicus - an old, new friend

On Saturday/Sunday mornings I go into a trance (sort of).  Get the insects, dust the insects, open enclosure, feed/water the geckos, check for eggs…. Next enclosure.  No, this is not boring at all, just a bit mechanical and routine.  Well, this past feeding was ANYTHING but routine!  Let me preface this story with the fact that about 3 months ago, the top of our grow outHemidactylus tanganicus enclosure was left just a bit open.  There was not much of an opening but, enough that I quickly realized that of the 3 juvenile, only one remained  (stupid gecko  J  ).  As quick and skillful as these animals are at hiding, I realized it would be nothing short of a miracle if I could catch them if I did not see them in the next couple days.  Well a couple days passed and then a couple weeks.  Still no sign of the escapees.  However, outside the leopard gecko room, closest to the door is our micro-gecko stand-  17 small enclosur [ ... ]

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New Rack For the Cave Geckos
Goniurosaurus orientalis

 My fascination with cave geckos started back several years ago but not until about 2010 did it really take off when I received my first 2 pair from Jim McDermott.  I couldn't resist a trade of one of the pair but a year later, started getting Goniurosaurus hainanensis eggs.     This year, I've added more species (yes, there are many species of cave geckos).  With the babies from last year, I decided I needed a new rack dedicated JUST to the caves.  Time to head to the store.........................   Believe me, when I start a project like this, I take DAYS to design.  Paralysis by analysis, yes that is me.  I had just a small space to work with 15" X 6' by 6'.  Deciding to go with more horizontal plastic tubs, I wanted a bunch of grow out and individual containers and a few 'pair'/'group' containers.  Right away I hit the Container Store webpage and found the sizes I wanted.  They carry a box by Iris.  No botto [ ... ]

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Paroedura picta are Hot
Paroedura picta are Hot

One of the geckos generating the most buzz right now is the Paroedura picta. Known as the 'ocelated gecko', 'Madagascar ground gecko', 'panther gecko' among other names, this gecko is in the public's eye and is HOT, HOT, HOT.  

So, why is it so popular right now? Well, there are many reasons. Let's review-   Obtainable - When I started in the hobby over 10 years ago, Paroedura picta were as plentiful as the common house gecko.  A couple years later and they were GONE.  No one had them.  As Yogi Berra would say "No one keeps P. picta because everyone keeps them".  So popular, they became unpopular.  They disappeared for a while.  Now, they are back! I started keeping them about 4 years ago and now have over 30 enclosures dedicated to this species.  Where can YOU find available P. picta to purchase?  From our store of course but also Kingsnake, your local reptile show, maybe your pet store.  They are readily available now, and th [ ... ]

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Paroedura picta caramel albino- What are the odds?
Paroedura picta caramel albino- What are the odds?

One breeding project we wanted to focus on this year at Supreme Gecko was the caramel albino Paroedura picta. Starting with 2 males and a het female a few years ago, we saw our very first baby last year- again a male.  Well, I had to have more of these beautiful animals.   I've been calling them Gold or Red but wil refer to them as their correct hobby name of Caramel Albino (or sometimes called T-Albino).  This morph should NOT be confused wth the carmel pictus morph (see below for a photo and description of both).   While these are seen in the hobby occasionally, P. picta breeders should be working more with this animal and produce more of this morph.
At the beginning of the year, I set out to produce more caramel albinos.  Unfortunately, the het female I received a number of years ago is now only a pet as I did not want to send her through another breeding year.  With the 3 caramel albino males, I setup a breeding with 2 of the males to 2 other fe [ ... ]

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Micro Geckos Slide Show

In the Summer of 2013, I had the honor of speaking at Madison Area Herpetology Society.  What a great organization, doing so much for the community.  My topic was Micro geckos and I had an absolute blast talking about these cute, active, tiny, hard to feed, tiny, beautiful...  did I mention tiny, geckos.   Many reading this will be familiar with only a few of the micro geckos.  One in paticular is super hot in the hobby right now, and for good reason, the Lygodactylus williamsi; better know as the Electric Blue.  What an amazing animals with a fascinating history in the hobby as well.  Lygodactylus was one of the 4 genuses discussed- others being Gonatodes, Sphaerodactylus, and Tropiocolotes.  I will not give too much more away on the presentation (you can view it below), other than saying these are fun animals as they are diurnal (active mostly during the day) meaning they are tons of fun to watch when you are awake.... and they are tiny. &nb [ ... ]

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Viper Geckos - Care Sheet
Viper Geckos - Care Sheet


Viper geckos are one of the neatest geckos out there due to their size and behavior. If you are considering raising vipers there are a few things you need to know to get started. In the pages that follow, I hope to provide the basic information you need to maintain a healthy pet viper gecko. Additional, more in-depth information can be found later in this chapter. If You Have Not Made The Purchase Yet....
Viper geckos have a few requirements you should know about before purchasing them as a pet.
Your new pet will require heat to their enclosure. They also feed on live foods and need to be provided a constant supply to grow. They are not one of the most easily handled reptiles due to their small size. Any time dedicated to handling should be limited to a few minutes per day and should exclude small children. When you are ready to purchase your first viper gecko, look for a healthy animal. Large, fat tails and perky disposition (not constantly sleeping) are two things to look fo [ ... ]

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Viper Geckos - Breeding
Viper Geckos - Breeding

  Before You Breed Your Gecko....
Before beginning a discussion on breeding, I must ask the following question- Are you prepared to breed your geckos?
That seems fairly obvious otherwise you wouldn't have visited this page. However, there are several points I would like to bring up before going any further
Do you have the knowledge? Well, hopefully that is why you are here. I have heard so often, or read on the internet so many times, "I have eggs, what should I do now!". Gaining the knowledge before breeding will benefit you, the new babies, and the parents. Are the Parents ready? Geckos generally do not breed during the cooler months of winter. Are you sure you have a pair? Are they healthy? Are they the right size? Is this the right season? Do you have the necessary equipment- incubator, scale, etc.? Are you prepared for the babies? Do you have the extra time and facility to check and care for the eggs and to house up to 20 babies per female you breed? Do you ha [ ... ]

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Micro Gecko Care- 5 Things You Must Know
gonatodes

So, you've seen the beautiful photos on the internet. You've seen the YouTube videos and now you would like to work with these 'micro' geckos.  Well, here are 5 things you must about them before taking the plunge.   First, let me define Micro Geckos.  While there are some small geckos in the genus Paroedura, Phelsuma, Hemidactylus, etc.  I am limiting my definition to the diurnal (Day active) in the genus Lygodactylus, Sphaerodactylus, or Gonatodes. All species in the above genus are very small, active, usually uniquely/beautifully colored gecko.  They are egg layers and their babies are minuscule!  They are fun geckos to work with but they do have some specific requirements/issues.   1. HARD TO FIND There are VERY FEW breeders in the US.  More in Europe but few in the US.  Occasionally there are listings on sites like Kingsnake and FaunaClassified but they are rare, usually listing wild animals, and the geckos [ ... ]

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Geckos Down Under - A Primer
Australian gecko basics

If you have seen them at a reptile show or on Facebook or on some breeder's web page, if you are like me, you have fallen in love with the Australian geckos.  What's not to love, they are unique, mostly small in size, rare, and above all extremely interesting in behavior.  The difficult part is learning about these animals.  Where do you find info?  Well, stay tuned as I will cover the basics of many types of the geckos 'down under'. Finding info on the Australian geckos is doable but you will need to piece together tidbits from forums, Facebook groups (see-and join Australian Geckos), and articles in such magazines as Reptiles.  But this will take time.  A great source is also A Complete Guide To Reptiles Of Australia ($750 used on Amazon).  Here is a quick guide to the more common genuses to get you started- Nephrurus Knob Tail Geckos-  Most common of the Aussies seen in the hobby.    Approx. dozen species.  2 groups [ ... ]

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When Do You Feed Your Gecko?
When Do You Feed Your Gecko?

While this may seem a simple question that doesn't warrant an article, I've spoken to many keepers recently that do not know why they are feeding their animals when they do.  I hope to shed some light on the topic below. First, let's narrow the focus down to a certain group of geckos- those that are nocturnal such as crested, gargoyle, leopard, pictus, some Australians, etc.  These animals snuggle into a little tree/rock crevice or under a group of leaves until the sun starts going down.  This is when the night animals turn it up a notch.  And what's on their minds?  Since there are no McBeetles or White Castle Worms in the wild, they cruse for dinner.  They don't usually eat to their fill, it is more like a bug here a bug there.  In fact, there may be nights where they do not even find anything to eat!  That's Nature. So how do we use this knowledge when keeping these animals in captivity?  Let's start with the mistake of overfeeding.&nbs [ ... ]

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Uroplatus ebenaui - A Maintenance History
Uroplatus ebenaui - A Maintenance History

Caresheets, breeding success stories, reptile show reports, etc. etc. etc.  I enjoy a nice article as much as the next hobbyist.  However, this one is going to be something a bit different.   Last year at the reptile show (NARBC) in Chicago friends like John, Nick, Harold, and Derek were throwing names of geckos around like crazy. My head was spinning. I just couldn't keep up talking about... well leopard, crested, and day geckos. I had to know more about the rich and wonderful group of reptiles we classify as geckos. At the show, I decided against purchasing new cresties and leos and picked up 5 N. wheeleri from John Z.  Beautiful animals. This was my start into diversifying my collection. In the past few months, several animals from different genus have been added (more on this later). Then, in April (2011) a wonderful breeder at the Scott Smith All animal show, Julie TenBensele of Chamo Wear offered me a pair of Uroplatus ebenaui for a very fair price. I jumped [ ... ]

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Chahoua Recovery

I know you've read my article about cutting open R. chahoua eggs.  Well, last night, after hatching out a chewie Saturday on it's own, I had to recover the second egg as after 2 days, it had not hatched out on its own.  This seems to happen quite a bit and after losing the second eggs the very first time, I now wait the two days and always go after the second egg if it does not work out.  Below are the two we were fortunate to hatch out this past weekend. First Hatchling   2nd- Recovered chahoua    

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Paroedura ibityensis Care Sheet
Paroedura ibityensis Care Sheet

  Common Name:    Ibity ground gecko Location: This species is endemic to Madagascar where it is known from two massifs, Ibity (Jackman et al. 2008) and Itremo, in the central highlands.  It is known to occur from 1,600 m asl. and its range may extend to the tops of the massifs, above 2,000 m.  It has an estimated extent of occurrence of 2,997 km².   nbsp; Paroedura ibityensis - Female (gravid) Background: This gecko inhabits low elevation humid and deciduous forest, in both disturbed and intact sites. It has also been found in plantations.  Paroedura ibityensis grow to a length of about 3" and maximum age is unknow. Enclosure Unlike the general care of Paroedura pictua, which are similarly terrestrial in nature as well, P. ibityensis enjoy more climbing and perching.  We offer plenty of hiding places using overturned plant saucers with notches, cork bark and fake plastic plants.  As well, climbing objects such as bran [ ... ]

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Paroedura stumpffi Care Sheet
Paroedura stumpffi Care Sheet

    Common Name:  None known
Location: This species is endemic to Madagascar, where it is known from a few localities in the north and west of the island at elevations of between 40 and 199 m (D'Cruze et al. 2007). It is expected to occur widely between the known sites, an area of approximately 59,000 km². /a> Background: This gecko inhabits low elevation humid and deciduous forest, in both disturbed and intact sites. It has also been found in plantations.  Paroedura stumpffi grow to a length of about 3" and maximum age is unknow. Enclosure Unlike the general care of Paroedura pictua, which are similarly terrestrial in nature as well, P. stumpffi enjoy more climbing and perching.  We offer plenty of hiding places using overturned plant saucers with notches, cork bark and fake plastic plants.  As well, climbing objects such as branches , bamboo, and again cork bark offer ample 'scouting' areas for the geckos.
Temperature P. stumpffi do best w [ ... ]

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Lygodactylus kimhowelli Care Sheet
Lygodactylus kimhowelli Care Sheet

    Common Name-  Yellow headed dwarf gecko Location- East Africa (Tanzania) Background: The Yellow Headed Dwarf Gecko is common throughout Tanzania and can easily be found on structures such as buildings and other man made objects. They have grey bodies with dark striping running along the length of their body, excluding their tails. The head is yellowish with the striping masked throughout.  Reaching a length of 3" they are extremely quick little geckos.  Along with the fact that they are diurnal (day active), this makes them highly desirable as a gecko to maintain.  Finally, it is believed that they may live 5-10 years. Enclosure We currently house our animals in 10 gallon enclosures but will change over to custom enclosures soon.  The aquarium is equipped with a screen top and two lights- one high intensity florescent (UVB could be substituted) and one puck light (up to 100 in a concentrated area).  Enclosure temps can stay in the 75 [ ... ]

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3 Steps to Successful Gecko Breeding
3 Steps to Successful Gecko Breeding

    There are so many factors in breeding reptiles, including breeding geckos.  Hundreds of factors?  Maybe.  However, after breeding several different types of geckos and focusing on leopard and crested geckos, I believe truly there are only 3 main factors that contribute to successful breeding.  Below, we will cover these 3 in detail.  Note-  this article will not delve into any breeding requirements concerning morphs, patterns, or color variants. No mention of high temps used to lighten leo colors.  Nor will this delve into TSD (temp sex determination).  Also, there are exceptions to all rules.  But, he info below should apply to 95% of situations (do your research). Without further adieu The Quality of the Adult Animals Rule #1, Start with a pair.  How do you tell if you have a male and female?  Check for the preformal pores and a bulge.  Here is an article to help tell the difference with crested geckos.&n [ ... ]

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Goniurosaurus hainanensis photos
Goniurosaurus hainanensis photos

SETUP   Cave geckos are nocturnal, ground dwelling geckos of 7-8 inches. Requiring high humidity with temps from 75-82.
Red Eyes
Simply irresistible-  Devil Red eyes.
   
 

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Paroedura androyensis photos

SETUP   The setup is designed for a mostly-terrestrial, animal-  sand peat mix for substrate, smaller slabs of cork bark to hide under and climb on, and a few magnolia-type leaves scattered about. Include a warm spot of about 90 F degrees.
 
       
 

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Sphaerodactylus torrei photos
Sphaerodactylus torrei photos

SETUP The setup is designed for a terrestrial, leaf litter animal-  sand peat mix for substrate, plastic plants for decor, terra cotta pot and cork bark hides, but most important magnolia leaves scattered about.  A high intensity light on top and an additional canister light with a 25w bulb for heat. JUVENILE
Remarkable striped pattern with white tail markings. These markings disappear into a translucent blue yellow body color as adults.    
 

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Gonatodes vittatus photos
Gonatodes vittatus photos

SETUP The setup is fairly basic-  sand peat mix for substrate, pathos plant, slate slab to temp regulate for the geckos.  A high intensity light on top and an additional canister light with a 25w bulb for heat. MALE Males display a 'skunk' white stripe extending down their entire body.  The upper half of their body, when showing off. FEMALE   The female lacks the intense orange and white striping. When gravid, females also appear heavier bodied than the males    
 

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Uroplatus henkeli Care Sheet
Uroplatus henkeli Care Sheet

 
Guest article by Joshua Vianes  (all photos by author) The Uroplatus (also commonly known as the "leaf-tailed gecko") is a unique species that comes from Madagascar. There are currently 12 species of Uroplatus: Uroplatus Alluaudi, Uroplatus Ebenaui, Uroplatus Fimbriatus, Uroplatus Henkeli, Uroplatus Lineatus, Uroplatus Guentheri, Uroplatus Malahelo, Uroplatus Malama, Uroplatus Phantasticus, Uroplatus Pietchmanni, Uroplatus Sikorae, and Uroplatus Sameiti. They vary in length, ranging anywhere from 3" to 12", with the Uroplatus Henkeli being the second largest in the Uroplatus species reaching around 10 or 11".

The Uroplatus species has been deeply affected by the deforestation in Madagascar, putting them on the Cited Appendix II list. This means they are not technically "endangered" but they are only allowing a certain number of each Uroplatus to be exported/imported each year. The majority of the Uroplatus that you will see in the pet trades will either be LTC (Long Term [ ... ]

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Gecko Shipment Casualty - A Cat Gecko Tale
Gecko Shipment Casualty - A Cat Gecko Tale

  Anytime one deals with animal shipments, there is an expectation that all will go well..... but sometimes it does not. The following is the tale of a gecko shipment that did not go as expected. As well, I will offer a couple tips that may save you frustrations with your future gecko shipments. A few weeks ago, I began discussing an order with a fellow gecko keeper. He was offering a trio (1.2) of cat geckos- Aeluroscalabotes felinus. We exchanged a few Emails and it was noted that the animals were long term captive kept, healthy, and I would be fortunate enough to have one of the females actually gravid! In the middle of these exchanges were requests for photos and the knowledge that the animals were eating. Unfortunately, in hindsight, I realize that these two queries were never addressed. Cat geckos are a very unique animal. Of course they are known for their cat-like, retractable claws. However, they are also tolerant of cooler temperatures- which works great for us geck [ ... ]

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Rhacodactylus chahoua - Eggs and Feeding Changes
Rhacodactylus chahoua - Eggs and Feeding Changes

For the first couple of years, I fed my pair of Rhacodactylus chahouas the diet suggested on care sheet after care sheet. While I’ve mostly stayed with the prescribed regiment, some modifications have been made. I feel these changes are a great benefit to my animals- now a 1.1 (one male, one female) group and a 1.4 group. My R. chahoua adventure started in 2006 with the purchase of a 1.1 pair from Philippe de Vosjoli of  giantgeckos.com With as much researching I could find about these animals, I settled on the feeding schedule of the Repashy MRP diet every other day with a spattering of suggested dusted cricket feedings. Success! The pair did well for a year before providing me with 3 pairs of eggs. I was so excited even though none of the eggs hatched out. I knew their eggs could get ‘over calcified’. ‘Over calcified’ Hmmmmm. Why was this such a documented issue with these animals? Some care sheets suggested EXTRA calcium dustings. Now that didn’t make sense to me [ ... ]

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Paroedura picta - Care Sheet
Paroedura picta - Care Sheet

    You may see articles listing them as one of the following- ocelot gecko, Madagascar ground gecko, panther gecko, big head gecko, or pictus geckos. These are all synonyms for Paroedura picta, one of the easiest-to-keep, most curious behavior geckos in the hobby.   Background Paroedura picta geckos are native, as the name suggests to Madagascar, are nocturnal (check out those eyes!), reach about 5 inches in length, and are terrestrial- living in the leaf litter of the forest. That is what the books will say. However, I find that they are one of the most ‘day’ active of any nocturnal gecko, and while I've kept them for years similarly to adult leopard geckos (bare bottom tank/sand substrate, hide, food & water bowls) recently have found they enjoy climbing on cork bark decorations. Often you will find the geckos perched on top of the enclosure decor, scouting the area like little prairie dogs.   p Adult P. picta can be housed in small enclosu [ ... ]

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Tokay Gecko Care Sheet
Tokay Gecko Care Sheet

    by Kris Baker   The Tokay Gecko (Gekko gecko) is a nocturnal arboreal gecko, ranging from northeast India and Bangladesh, throughout Southeast Asia, Philippines, to Indonesia and western New Guinea. In the late 1980s and early 1990s it was introduced into Hawaii, Florida, Texas, Belize, and several Caribbean islands, where it can be considered an invasive species. They are becoming increasingly popular in the pet trade due to their beautiful colors and entertaining vocalizations, however, their attitude isn't as charming as their looks. The bite of a Tokay Gecko (often called "The Pit Bull of the Gecko World), is not always, but can be very painful. If irritated, they have been known to draw blood and hold on for long periods of time. I have personally had a Tokay clamp on to my hand for well over 2 hours before finally letting go. If you want a beautiful animal that you don't have to handle, then a Tokay Gecko is a good choice.


Availability ------------
Tok [ ... ]

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Paroedura picta Geckos - Morphs
Paroedura picta Geckos - Morphs

Paroedura picta come in many colors and patterns. There are dark ones, light ones, stripped ones and patterned ones. Color pattern morphs in pictus geckos are just starting to get recognition in the hobby- just like leopard gecko color morphs about 10-12 years ago.   Normal Even in their normal phase, P. picta are an attractive little animal. With barring and a reddish brown color, they are a noticeable additional in anyone's collection.     Stripe We all know about the striped African Fat Tails and how attractive they are. Well, I feel a full stripped picta is just as beautiful. Realize there are different variations of the stripe as well.   Snow coming soon   Caramel Albino - Xanthic (T+ Albino)   Our favorite morph. The caramel albino is spectacular in these two examples below.     Yellow coming soon   Hypo coming soon    


 

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Picta Geckos - Setup Extras
Picta Geckos - Setup Extras

  Most people think of Paroedura picta as terrestrial geckos (living on the ground), which they are- but they are more than this. For several years, we kept our pictus over sand, included a few overturned flower saucers as hiding places, and a food and water dish. For breeding females we also added a small hide box for egg laying (which they never used of course). Occasionally, I would find them perched on top of the hide box, the highest point in the enclosure. Some times they would launch to the hide so they could get a better view of what was going on around them. Further research and a conversation with another hobbyist relieved the preference for climbing and standing 'look out' reminiscent of our native prairie dogs. To give them the perches they desired so much, I picked up some pieces of cork bark (lightweight and attractive) and placed them in their enclosures. Now I have happy little P. picta geckos scouting out my every move high atop their cork bark perches.



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Paroedura picta Geckos - Health

  TAIL LOSS P. picta are ravenous eaters due to their metabolism that resembles a 6 year old hyped up on county fair cotton candy. As a result, if keeping multiple pictus together, it is not uncommon to experience tail loss. Picta will regrow their tails, although it will be a bit shorter and wider in appearance. Concerning the damage caused by the lost tail, some suggest treating the area with ointment such as Neosporen. We have never taken this action and have never had a problem such as infection. Keeping the picta enclosure clean is  priority to minimize the chance for infection.   MALE AGGRESSION It is a well documented fact that male picta are rather 'amorous'. They will direct a lot of attention to the females. It is best to 1) only introduce the male wiht the female occasionally and only for short periods of time and 2) Give the female a rest period. Keep them separated for several months (fall to early Spring is best) to give the female a break from laying  [ ... ]

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Paroedura picta Hatched With Parents!

    We answer the question- “Can Paroedura picta babies hatch and live with their parents?” A little over a couple of months ago, I was asked if one could leave the eggs of P. picta with their parents and expect the newborns to be ignored after their hatching. What a great question and one that needed to be answered as I could find nothing on the internet about this.
for 3 lays I left the eggs in with the female (15 qt tub, ½ inch sand and a couple of hides- and no male). Checking every other day when I fed, I could see the eggs just peeking over the sand, under their private hide that the female seemed to ignore. I never saw any sign that the female even cared about her earlier laid eggs.

Finally about 65 days post lay of the first eggs, I lifted the ‘egg’ hide and there it was. One solo hatchling. Well, I reasoned, I’m sure the female has been in contact with this miniature picta so they must be able to co-exist. Right?
Moving the ‘egg’ hide caus [ ... ]

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Paroedura picta Geckos - Breeding
Paroedura picta Geckos - Breeding

    While some will say breeding picta is as easy as putting two adults together of differing sex, I would say there is more to breeding P. picta than meets the eye. Sexing picta Around 3-4 months of age (yes, I said 3-4 months!) male picta will start visibly showing a distending bulge at the base of their tail. They will also, usually be a bit bulkier than females of the same age. This does mean that they are ready to begin breeding this young. More on this later. If kept in grow-out groups, males will show off and display aggression to each other once they begin to mature. Breeding your picta Again, while males will begin showing sexual dimorphism (differences) at a very young age, your pair should NOT be bred at this age. With the normal stress of egg laying on the female, breeding your picta this young will certainly result in her demise. It is preferable to wait until the pair are around 8-10 months of age. On another note, P. picta are known to be extremely prof [ ... ]

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Paroedura picta - Baby Setup

We keep our P. picta baby setups very basic. The enclosure starts with the substrate. We prefer to use sand for these geckos- Reptilite as it has less dust, is fine but not too fine, and does not compact. Start with about a half inch or so. Next, provide some hiding places. Our favorite to use is overturned flower pot saucers. If you use the terra cotta saucers, a notch will need to be made in the side to give the geckos and entrance to teh hide. You can use a hammer and flat head screwdriver for this but be very careful not to take too much off with each hit. Plastic saucers are less expensive, weigh less and can be cut with a utility knife or tin snip type of tool. Finally, I like to add some additional decorations such as cork bark and plastic plants. As the decorations reach the top of the enclosure, be warned that the geckos WILL find any holes in between the tank and the top. Finally, include a food dish for the geckos. My favorite is actually the top of a deli cup as the mealwor [ ... ]

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General Gecko Health Care

The first step in correcting any health issue with your gecko is prevention.

  Purchase a healthy gecko
When you select your gecko make sure it looks healthy and it freely moves around (especially juveniles which will be quite jumpy). When held, it should be 'observant', looking around attentively.
Also, look at the tail. Unless very young, leopard and AFT geckos should have fat, healthy tails. Crested geckos may be missing their tails but this is not a problem with health.
If there are signs of shed on the tail, face, toes, there may be issues with the animal being kept in a low humidity environment.
Some issues may be more visible and must be avoided such as open sores, discolored skin areas, recent tail loss, or discharge from the nose or eyes.
Finally, ask the retail store or breeder if the animal is healthy and what type of return policy they provide. Keeping a Healthy Gecko Healthy
Again, the first step to a healthy gecko is prevention. When handling your geckos and anything [ ... ]

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Rhacodactylus Chahoua - Morphs

Currently there are no recognized 'morphs' for Rhacodactylus chahoua. There is a distinct pattern in some chewies. A white band shows up on some just behind the head region. This is known as the 'White Collar' trait. There are two different recognized locations of Rhac. chahouas- those coming from Pine Island and those coming from the New Caledonia. Identification should be left to an expert as there are characteristics that very difficult to distinguish between the two. Currently Pine Islands are more desirable in the hobby. Differences Mainland- bug eyes, smaller size Pine Island- 'white collar', grow larger      



 

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Rhacodactylus Chahoua - Health

Calcium deficiency (MBD) Normally this is a rare occurrence in Rhacodactylus chahoua geckos. The disease is typical of insufficient nutrients in the geckos diet, especially at a young age. Also known as MBD- muscular bone disease it is reversible to a point and best prevented than trying to treat the problem after noticing it. Geckos need a certain amount of calcium to develop and maintain bones mass. The effects of an insufficient amount of calcium is a gecko that looks weak, walks with shaking motions, and most notably a wavy tail. This can be achieved by: Dusting- adding calcium dust to the feeder insects Adding calcium in the gecko's moist food- friut or baby food Feeding CGD (Repashy Crested Gecko Diet) It is certainly much easier and less expensive feeding the CGD than trying to balance their requirements on our own. We strongly suggest to R. chahoua gecko owners a Pro-Active approach to avoiding the problem by excluding baby food completely from their diet, feeding  [ ... ]

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Rhacodactylus Chahoua - Care Sheet
Rhacodactylus Chahoua - Care Sheet

A few years ago, a gecko friend in the Madison, Wisconsin area and I were talking crested geckos and she mentioned that one of her goals in the hobby was to work with the Rhacodactylus chahoua. Well, I felt foolish but I had to ask what the heck a chahoua was. She spent the next several minutes filling me in on their virtues. At that moment, I decided that one of my goals in the hobby was to work with the Rhacodactylus chahoua. I had to decided, do I try to find a few juveniles and hope for a male and a female or do I search web page after web page, reptile show after reptile show for an adult pair. My goal was to eventually own a pair and breed these unique animals. After doing both for a couple of months, I made the decision to take whatever I could get as the pickings for R. chahoua were few and far between. R. chahoua is one species of 6 in the genus Rhacodactylus. The most common and widely known  is the crested gecko, a smaller cousin of the R. chahoua or chewies as they [ ... ]

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Viper Geckos - Breeding
Viper Geckos - Breeding

  Before You Breed Your Gecko....
Before beginning a discussion on breeding, I must ask the following question- Are you prepared to breed your geckos?
That seems fairly obvious otherwise you wouldn't have visited this page. However, there are several points I would like to bring up before going any further
Do you have the knowledge? Well, hopefully that is why you are here. I have heard so often, or read on the internet so many times, "I have eggs, what should I do now!". Gaining the knowledge before breeding will benefit you, the new babies, and the parents. Are the Parents ready? Geckos generally do not breed during the cooler months of winter. Are you sure you have a pair? Are they healthy? Are they the right size? Is this the right season? Do you have the necessary equipment- incubator, scale, etc.? Are you prepared for the babies? Do you have the extra time and facility to check and care for the eggs and to house up to 20 babies per female you breed? Do you ha [ ... ]

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Viper Geckos - Care Sheet
Viper Geckos - Care Sheet


Viper geckos are one of the neatest geckos out there due to their size and behavior. If you are considering raising vipers there are a few things you need to know to get started. In the pages that follow, I hope to provide the basic information you need to maintain a healthy pet viper gecko. Additional, more in-depth information can be found later in this chapter. If You Have Not Made The Purchase Yet....
Viper geckos have a few requirements you should know about before purchasing them as a pet.
Your new pet will require heat to their enclosure. They also feed on live foods and need to be provided a constant supply to grow. They are not one of the most easily handled reptiles due to their small size. Any time dedicated to handling should be limited to a few minutes per day and should exclude small children. When you are ready to purchase your first viper gecko, look for a healthy animal. Large, fat tails and perky disposition (not constantly sleeping) are two things to look fo [ ... ]

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